Posts

Recycling In Life Series – Meekness Study – 16We have seen that Moses accepted all that God did with a humble heart having learned through many lessons of life and personal conversations with God that being a usable instrument in the mighty hand of the Everlasting God was a far greater honor than listening to the accolades of man for a season. Moses's meekness was the result of knowing himself, God, his circumstances and his calling. There are three "semesters" to Moses' life which reveal much about him and much about God. His first forty years were the semester of learning which includes his birth to his exile from Egypt that was necessary because of his killing of an Egyptian. Special features of this time were his protection at birth, the special attention of Pharaoh's daughter, and his being instilled with a special calling by his birth family. The second forty years was his semester of leaning which began with his exile from Egypt and ended when God sent him …

Recycling In Life Series – Meekness – 15

Meekness is described as power under restraint, but is qualified as not referring as much to outward physical strength as to inward soul strength. It is supposedly a "self-controlled" strength, reasonable but not weak and involving a yielding but not spineless assent. It is described further as a gentle manliness which is not native to the human heart. But by spiritual definition, it is recognition of God's hand in every situation rather than to be fighting against Him. Moses was identified as the meekest man on the earth and this illustrates clearly the embodiment of this word. He wrote of himself, "Now Moses was a very humble man, more humble than anyone else on the face of the earth." (Numbers 12:3) We might question this coming from his own hand, however he wrote under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, so we take it as truth. He dealt with a petulant people always getting into trouble. They were selfish, idolatrous, rebellious and perpetual whiners. Someti…

Gifts

All of us have grown up in a family. We have lived in the circumstances our parents created and it became the norm for us. If we were poor, then we lived without much. If we were rich we lived with plenty. If we were more than poor but less than rich, then we accepted that also. It was the life we were given. Now, that is not to say that some don't become unsatisfied with their lot and make a conscious decision to change it. Then, their children become used to something different. The writer of Hebrews shows us the distinct difference between the Old Covenant, wrapped up in the Law and its sacrifices, and the New Covenant, wrapped up in Jesus Christ and his sacrifice. The Old Covenant left us wanting. Sacrifices for sin had to be perpetually given. There was no permanence to forgiveness only a covering over, sometimes called atonement. But Christ's work on the cross ushered in the New Covenant; one that was permanent, full of promise for today and eternity to come. Peter in his …

Prudent Person

There is definitely a difference between a wise person and a fool. Solomon saw that difference in the way each responded to the same information. He said, "A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton [fool] goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." (Proverbs 27:12) The actions of the prudent person are to see danger coming in advance; to see signs that point to danger in the distance. A road sign that indicates a sharp curve ahead suggests that speed should be lowered to execute the turn successfully. The wise driver heeds the sign, cuts his speed, navigates the turn and travels on without incident. The simpleton ignores the sign, challenges the curve for fun and ends up over the cliff, down the embankment, broken and dying. When Jesus was sent to be crucified, he was first taken by soldiers to their headquarters. They called the entire regiment to mock him, put a crown of thorns on his head, placed a reed stick in his right hand as a scepter, kn…

Thanks

We often get so caught up in our daily lives that we fail to thank God or the people around us that help us and do good work. Thankfulness is an attitude of gratefulness and expresses appreciation to another for small or large actions they take on our behalf. As we enter into the Thanksgiving season, and for that matter the rest of our year, it is important to share thanks with God and others. The psalmist gives us a good example of the cycle that usually takes place in our lives that lead to thankfulness. He said, "Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good! His faithful love endures forever." (Ps. 107: 1) He then moves through four life situations in which the cycle is displayed that leads to thankfulness. Situation 1: "Some wandered in the wilderness, lost and homeless." They cried out, "Lord, help!...He rescued them from their distress." "Let them praise the Lord for His great love and for the wonderful things He has done for them." (107:6, 8) Sit…

At God's Right Hand

At God's Right Hand  We have a visual picture of Jesus healing, teaching, challenging, or on the cross in the Gospels as he completes his life work, but how do we see Jesus now? There are two pictures given to us after Jesus ascended into heaven in Acts 1. The first is of him sitting on the right hand of God the Father. The writer of Hebrews said, "When he had cleansed us from our sins, he sat down in the place of honor at the right hand of the majestic God in heaven." (Hebrews 1:3b, 13) And, "a High Priest who sat down in the place of honor beside the throne of the majestic God in heaven."(8:1) Jesus also said to the High Priest at his trial "You will see the Son of Man seated in the place of power at God's right hand…" (Mark 14:62) The second is of Christ standing beside God the Father. David declared before King Saul that God was his "advocate." (1 Samuel 24:15) When John the Apostle was ushered into heaven which enabled him to write th…

Mercy

This is a person who does something out of the ordinary for someone in need. Jesus was asked by an expert in Jewish law the question "Who is my neighbor?" To which he responded with the story of a Samaritan who extended mercy to a man left by robbers on the side of the road. Samaritans were looked down upon because of their intermarriage with gentiles during the Assyrian captivity. Their allegiances flip flopped on a regular basis between Judah and rising empires. Because of this, Samaritans were denied by Zerubbabel the privilege of working to rebuild Jerusalem and its Temple. But, this good Samaritan came upon a man lying beside the road very near to death. Two other men, a priest and a Levite, who worked at the Temple in Jerusalem, passed by prior to the Samaritan and made no effort to help the dying man. But he "took pity on him…, bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then, he put the man on his own donkey, took him to an inn and took care of him," payin…